The Paleo Diet Cookbook

The Paleo Diet Cookbook: More Than 370 Recipes for Paleo Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinners, Snacks, and Beverages  
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Dr. Loren Cordain’s The Paleo Diet has helped thousands of people lose weight, keep it off, and learn how to eat for good health by following the diet of our Paleolithic ancestors and eating the foods we were genetically designed to eat. Now this revolutionary cookbook gives you more than 150 satisfying recipes packed with great flavors, variety, and nutrition to help you enjoy the benefits of eating the Paleo way every day.
Based on the breakthrough diet book that has sold more than 100,000 copies to date
Includes 150 simple, all-new recipes for delicious and Paleo-friendly breakfasts, brunches, lunches, dinners, snacks, and beverages
Contains 2 weeks of meal plans and shopping and pantry tips
Features 16 pages of Paleo color photographs
Helps you lose weight and boost your health and energy by focusing on lean protein and non-starchy vegetables and fruits
From bestselling author Dr. Loren Cordain, the world’s leading expert on Paleolithic eating styles
Put The Paleo Diet into action with The Paleo Diet Cookbook and eat your way to weight loss, weight control maintenance, increased energy, and lifelong health-while enjoying delicious meals you and your family will love.

Paleo Diet Cookbook

Boat Plans – Boat Building Package

Boat Plans – Boat Building Package

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If you want to build a boat, we have what you need.  Chesapeake Light Craft is your source for boat kits, kayak kits, boat plans, and boatbuilding materials. Our original, award-winning boat designs include kayaks, canoes, rowing boats, dinghies, and sailboats. More than 20,000 CLC boats are on the water.  Our designs are built by amateurs and professionals alike in more than 70 countries around the world.

Enjoy hours of free boatbuilding video content, including this 14-part how-to that takes you through a stitch-and-glue kayak kit from start to finish.  Dozens of videos on strip-planked kayaks are here, and most boat pages have engaging intro videos like this one.  

On this site you will find not just boat kits and plans but boatbuilding materials, marine plywood, boatbuilding tools, MAS epoxy, paint and varnish, kayak and canoe paddles, oars, paddling gear, books, DVDs, and sails. Have a boatbuilding question? Check out our pages of illustrated boatbuilding tips and tricks.

CLC Kits: As Featured in MAKE: Ultimate Kit GuideAt our Annapolis showroom and boatbuilding shop you can see finished examples of our boat kits and pick up boatbuilding supplies and paddling gear. However, most of our business is through the mail: we will ship one of our meticulously prepared boat kits right to your door.

It’s a big web site, so please use our handy search tool to find the right kayak kit, canoe kit, sailboat kit, rowboat kit, or paddleboard kit for you.  Let us help you build your own boat.

CLICK HERE FOR BOAT PLANS

Shed Plans – Start Building Amazing Outdoor Sheds

Build Your Own Garden Shed From PM Plans
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If you’re like most homeowners, you know that there’s no such thing as enough storage space. There’s a limit, after all, to the things you can squirrel away in your basement and garage. What you really need is a garden shed–one large enough to house an arsenal of outdoor power tools while providing organized space for everything from rakes and shovels to fertilizer and fuel.

There are two choices when it comes to building a wooden garden shed: You can buy a kit–and put up with the manufacturer’s choice of materials and layout–or you can design a structure to suit your own particular needs and tastes. This approach may cost more and take longer, but it’s the best way to get what you want. We had in mind a basic 9 x 13-ft. shed built with decent materials and conventional framing methods

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO….

How To Build A Greenhouse

Planning and Building a Greenhouse

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Careful planning is important before a home greenhouse project is started. Building a greenhouse does not need to be expensive or time-consuming. The final choice of the type of greenhouse will depend on the growing space desired, home architecture, available sites, and costs. The greenhouse must, however, provide the proper environment for growing plants.

Location

The greenhouse should be located where it gets maximum sunlight. The first choice of location is the south or southeast side of a building or shade trees. Sunlight all day is best, but morning sunlight on the east side is sufficient for plants. Morning sunlight is most desirable because it allows the plant’s food production process to begin early; thus growth is maximized. An east side location captures the most November to February sunlight. The next best sites are southwest and west of major structures, where plants receive sunlight later in the day. North of major structures is the least desirable location and is good only for plants that require little light.

Deciduous trees, such as maple and oak, can effectively shade the greenhouse from the intense late afternoon summer sun; however, they should not shade the greenhouse in the morning. Deciduous trees also allow maximum exposure to the winter sun because they shed their leaves in the fall. Evergreen trees that have foliage year round should not be located where they will shade the greenhouse because they will block the less intense winter sun. You should aim to maximize winter sun exposure, particularly if the greenhouse is used all year. Remember that the sun is lower in the southern sky in winter causing long shadows to be cast by buildings and evergreen trees (Figure 1).

Good drainage is another requirement for the site. When necessary, build the greenhouse above the surrounding ground so rainwater and irrigation water will drain away. Other site considerations include the light requirements of the plants to be grown; locations of sources of heat, water, and electricity; and shelter from winter wind. Access to the greenhouse should be convenient for both people and utilities. A workplace for potting plants and a storage area for supplies should be nearby.

Types of Greenhouses

A home greenhouse can be attached to a house or garage, or it can be a freestanding structure. The chosen site and personal preference can dictate the choices to be considered. An attached greenhouse can be a half greenhouse, a full-size structure, or an extended window structure. There are advantages and disadvantages to each type.

Attached Greenhouses

Lean-to. A lean-to greenhouse is a half greenhouse, split along the peak of the roof, or ridge line (Figure 2A), Lean-tos are useful where space is limited to a width of approximately seven to twelve feet, and they are the least expensive structures. The ridge of the lean-to is attached to a building using one side and an existing doorway, if available. Lean-tos are close to available electricity, water and heat. The disadvantages include some limitations on space, sunlight, ventilation, and temperature control. The height of the supporting wall limits the potential size of the lean-to. The wider the lean-to, the higher the supporting wall must be. Temperature control is more difficult because the wall that the greenhouse is built on may collect the sun’s heat while the translucent cover of the greenhouse may lose heat rapidly. The lean-to should face the best direction for adequate sun exposure. Finally, consider the location of windows and doors on the supporting structure and remember that snow, ice, or heavy rain might slide off the roof or the house onto the structure.

Click Here To Lear More….

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